Suit Selection Guide

This option allows you to choose from a selection of hazard types and customize the level of protection to your needs. Warning: This will result in a generic recommendation due to the lack of test data.

Biological Hazard Disclaimer

This biohazard assessment guide is designed to show the most appropriate protective coverall for use against potentially infected blood and body fluids.

A protective single use coverall is one part of a system of protection for use against potentially infected blood and body fluids. A proper system of protection, including respiratory protection consistent with OSHA 29 CFR 1910.134, eye and face protection, examination gloves, boot/shoe covers and over aprons are needed in addition to the coverall. The overall design of this system of protection ensures that no worker skin is exposed and that contact with the blood or body fluids is minimized or eliminated based on the level of risk and exposure.

Healthcare workers must be properly trained and show proficiency in the use of PPE, primarily in safe donning and doffing.

The recommendations provided in this guide are consistent with the guidance provided by OSHA and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention described in the OSHA PPE Selection Matrix for Occupational Exposure to Ebola Virus.

The guidance describes protective coveralls in three basic performance areas.

  • Standard Precautions – typical PPE for normal work tasks
  • Fluid Resistant – When the anticipated risk of exposure to blood and body fluids is low, employers should provide workers with fluid-resistant garments. Fluid-resistant coveralls should be made of fabric and constructed with seams that pass: (1) American Association of Textile Chemists and Colorists (AATCC) 42 Impact Penetration Test at 1 g or below and AATCC 127 Hydrostatic Head Test at 50 cm or above, or (2) EN 20811 Hydrostatic Head Test at 50 cm or above, or (3) American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) F1670 Synthetic Blood Penetration Resistance Test, or (4) International Organization for Standardization (ISO) 16603 Synthetic Blood Penetration Resistance Test (at 3.5 kilopascal [kPa] or above).
  • Impermeable – When the anticipated risk of exposure to blood and body fluids is high, employers should provide workers with impermeable garments. Impermeable coveralls should be made of fabric and constructed with seams that pass ASTM F1671 Bloodborne Pathogen Penetration Resistance Test or ISO 16604 Bloodborne Pathogen Penetration Resistance Test (at 14 kPa or higher). In absence of manufacturer-provided data on seams, select a garment constructed with an appropriate seaming technique (e.g., taped seams).